Rorschach Summer Seminars on 31st July – 2nd August 2020 in Prague, Czech Republic 

Expressions and Complexities of Depression on Projective Tests 

Jim Kleiger, Psy.D, Bethesda, MD, USA – Discussant 

Advances in biopsychiatry and cognitive neuroscience have transformed the face of depression in ways both helpful and limiting. Once considered a symptom of loss, a marker of developmental capacity, or byproducts of an embattled self or retroflected aggression, contemporary views of depression are often narrow – confined to symptoms and regarded solely as illness states or points on a spectrum of mood disorders. Projective methods provide ways to look beyond the symptoms and understand the myriad meanings of depression, its underpinnings, phenomenology, and treatment implications. Presenters will illustrate the role of projective methods in illuminating the complexities of depression in various diagnostic contexts and treatment settings.

Jim Kleiger, Psy.D., ABPP, ABAP is in private practice in Bethesda, Maryland. A Fellow in the Society for Personality Assessment and Past President of the Baltimore Washington Psychoanalytic Society, Jim is a novelist and author of three books on the Rorschach assessment of psychosis and disordered thinking. 

Lecturers and Presentations 
A History of Depression on the Rorschach

Marek Macák, Prague, Czech Republic 

Across the history of our field, various authors have devised many ways of capturing depression in Rorschach, stressing both different aspects of the patients’ production and using different understandings of the depressive experience. This landscape of ideas and practices can enrich and contextualise our contemporary understanding and practice. The historical presentation will be framed by metatheoretical reflection on the structure of interpretive processes involved in assessment.

Marek Macák is a licensed clinical psychologist from Prague, Czech Republic. He has worked at Prague’s Psychiatric Clinic of the General University Hospital and now works as a lecturer and supervisor at various other clinical institutions. In private practice, he works mainly with adult clients with personality disorders. He is a part of faculty at the Institute of Clinical Psychology where he teaches Rorschach from perspective that integrates the Exner Comprehensive System and psychodynamic interpretation. Currently he serves as the president of the Czech Society for Rorschach and Projective Methods.

Locating Depression on the Rorschach Amid Competing Diagnoses

Jed Yalof, Psy.D, Immaculata University, PA, USA 

Depression and anxiety occur together more often in people diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) compared to people without an ADHD diagnosis. A case is presented to illustrate how the presence or even unexpected absence of Rorschach structural variables presumed to be characteristic of depression, when combined with self-reported symptoms of depression, and Rorschach response content can illuminate depressive personality features amid competing diagnoses. 

Jed Yalof, Psy.D, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology and Counseling, and Director of the Psy.D Program in Clinical Psychology at Immaculata University, where he was former Director of College Counseling and Diagnostic Testing Services. Dr. Yalof is board certified in clinical psychology, assessment psychology, school neuropsychology, and adult psychoanalysis, and completed postdoctoral programs in school psychology, neuropsychology, and psychoanalysis. He is a Supervising and Training Analyst at the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia. 

Locating Depression on the Rorschach Amid Competing Diagnoses Depression and anxiety occur together more often in people diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) compared to people without an ADHD diagnosis. A case is presented to illustrate how the presence or even unexpected absence of Rorschach structural variables presumed to be characteristic of depression, when combined with self-reported symptoms of depression, and Rorschach response content can illuminate depressive personality features amid competing diagnoses. 

The need to feel alive – different faces of depression in young offenders

Cecilia Kallenberg, Psy.D and Malin Holm, Psy.D, Stockholm, Sweden 

Depressive states are common in young offenders and important to recognize, to fully understand what may drive violent, anti-social behaviors. Performance tests are indispensable as depressive feelings are often disguised and denied. We develop concepts around depression and violence and also touch upon the psychology of “toxic masculinity”. Our methodological framework is multi-method assessment with an extra twist as we in this case adopt blind interpretation of the Wartegg, before integrating the results with other test data. 

Cecilia Kallenberg, Psy.D / psychotherapist, Rorschach teacher (R-PAS). I work with counselling, psychotherapies and assessment in forensic settings and institutional care for adolescents and young adults, in addition to having a private practice. 

 

Malin Holm, Psy.D specialized in personality assessment since 20 years, 10 years in adolescent psychiatric inpatient and institutional settings, 10 years as self-employed. Wartegg-teacher (CWS). 

 

 

 

 

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